Milestones: My Half-Marathon Experience

Thursday, July 11 was a major milestone on my cancer journey: I had my chemo port out after more than a year. When I would talk to people about it leading up to the procedure, they were so excited because the port is often considered the symbolic end of the cancer journey (though its never really over.)  I was surprised at their reaction at first because it didn’t seem real for me and I had trouble sharing their excitement. The port extraction just felt like the last thing on a long to-do list related to cancer. A major part of my lack of enthusiasm was the anxiety of having another procedure done.

My oncologist actually suggested I get it taken out in March, but I was feeling really overwhelmed at the time. I really wanted to get back to a “normal” routine with work, fitness, life, (and be in the millions of weddings I was in this year without having a open wound going on in the photographs) and surgery was just not a part of that equation for me… even if it was for a positive reason! I was also just generally adverse to being cut open in any way… however, I am happy to report that having a foreign object taken out of your body is apparently much easier than having it put in (at least in my case it was!) I was on significantly less sedation for the procedure itself, so I didn’t get sick afterward and I was much less sore. I still spent the next four days laying on my couch and groggily watching TV, but I think that had a lot to do with the cold I developed the day before surgery than the procedure itself. I am also excited because I am only restricted from swimming and working out for a week as opposed to several months like last year. The incision itself is still sore and itchy, but life is otherwise pretty much back to normal.

One of the reasons I’ve been so slow  to blog is because I’ve been out there “living it” as the young adult cancer community loves to say. My last post updated through Memorial Day weekend… and June was no less busy and exciting than April & May! I absolutely love the summer time and I wasn’t able to enjoy it at all last year. Surgeries + chemo + radiation = a lot of water & sunlight restrictions… which pretty much limits most fun activities in Texas.

June started off with a  bang as I hopped onto a plane to San Diego with my team-in-training teammates for the Rock N’ Roll San Diego half-marathon. As I have mentioned on here a few times, my sister Theresa, also signed up for the race with TNT and met me there. Neither one of us had a lot of time to research the area, but we both quickly fell in love with San Diego. The weather is pretty much perfect year round, the food is superb and there were plenty of historic sites … including a couple of ghost tours (which I am pretty much obsessed with!)

My friend from childhood, Megan, also did the race with me. When we got in on Friday, we all met up at the expo and one of the things we did was stop at the Delete Blood Cancer booth who were there to register bone marrow donors. I’m permanently deferred from donation due to my lymphoma diagnosis, however, both Megan and Theresa became my heroes by registering. I tweeted this pic and was retweeted by Delete Blood cancer, it was pretty bad ass.

Delete Blood Cancer

The next day we took the opportunity to visit the San Diego Zoo and met up with my dad’s cousins, who we hadn’t seen in about 13 years. Pretty much the only thing I knew about San Diego was the zoo, so we just had to go there… much to my coach’s dismay since we were supposed to stay off our feet as much as possible before the race… oh well! When in San Diego… go see the zoo! It was pretty awesome. My favorite part was seeing the Galapagos sea turtles! We were close enough to pet them but they were having none of that. I was amazed not only by their size, but because some of them had been alive since before Abraham Lincoln was president!

sea turtles

That evening we went to the Inspiration Dinner for Team In Training which was a really incredible and unique experience. As you walk into the banquet room, all the coaches and mentors from around the country line up and cheer everyone on. Many people reached out to me and patted me on the back or gave me high fives, some because they knew I was a survivor and others just because! One of the proudest moments for me is when they asked people to stand up if they were survivors, and to stay standing if we were also participating in the race, and to keep standing if we were participating and also an honored hero. I was one of maybe only five or six others who stayed standing the whole time in a room of about 1,500 people. It was very surreal.

One of the speaker’s has a father who passed away from blood cancer and a son who is here today due to the advancements in cures funded by the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society and TNT. The whole evening really shot home to me why we do the things we do. Team In Training folks had raised an outstanding $4.5 million for this event alone! I was so proud to be a part of that. There was also a nice bonus surprise because it was at the Inspiration Dinner that the race director announced that the Rock N’ Roll series was introducing a bonus medal for charity runners… which meant we got one but TWO medals if we finished the race the next day instead of just one. I’m all about the bling so I was super stoked!

Spoiler alert: I finished the race and this is what my rockin’ medals look like!

It was important to remember the reasons we signed up for TNT the next morning because we woke up dark and early at around 4:30 a.m. to catch the buses with our respective chapters. However, we were all so caught up in the moment and charged for our race, I don’t think we cared a hole lot about the wake up time. When we got to our corrals (many hours later) I felt the need to take a lot of obnoxious photographs. The race happened to take place on National Cancer Survivor’s Day on June 2, so I also felt the need to post all these photos across various social media declaring how bad ass I was for doing a half-marathon and being a cancer survivor (I am not egotistical at all…)

They generally are some version of this:

20130602_070149

Megan & Theresa were much cuter/calmer than me.

20130602_070143

There were also a ton of people there, about 30,000.

20130602_072646

You can get a vague impression of the huge crowd from this photo.

The race itself went surprisingly well. Theresa & I stayed together almost the entire time. I’m a walker and Theresa generously decided to walk alongside me so we could have the experience together. However, there were enough epic downhill stretches that we decided to run a few (I’m more willing to run if gravity is on my side doing most of the work!) The weather was absolutely wonderful and the temperature was in the 70’s the whole way. The San Diego folks had chairs set up along the race cheering everyone on whilst drinking at 7 a.m. It actually made me feel like I was back home in Louisiana for a Mardi Gras parade. Some folks even had signs that signs that said, “Worst parade ever.” At this point I was focused on staying ahead of the time limit, so there was no time to take photos for documentation purposes. Toward the end of the race I was feeling more confident that I would easily make it across the finish line with time to spare so I stopped to take a few photos of the course.

Theresa, Megan and I all fundraised as part of Team Jackie in honor of our teammate’s sister Jackie Sharp who passed away last year from leukemia. It was very motivating to see this sign toward the end of the race.

20130602_102429

I’m not sure why I felt the need to take a picture of the 12 mile marker and no others, but I did! This was at the end of a pretty long downhill stretch and Theresa & I were both a little woozy.

20130602_105851

In the end, we both made it across the finish line RUNNING and holding hands at 3:48:03. The folks taking photos didn’t snap a great shot of this at all, but it was pretty amazing. I technically beat Theresa by one second, and I have a feeling this is an achievement I will never accomplish again!

966917_10102290581333675_2118104812_o

I also thought it’d be cute to bite my medal like an olympian… it wasn’t.

All jokes aside, I cannot express enough how important it was for me to accomplish this goal. Being able to finish a half-marathon less than one year out of treatment, on National Cancer Survivor’s Day, as a way to raise awareness and research funds in honor of people like Grant, Jeannie, Brent, Jackie, Jay, Sam and all those who have fought cancer … was incredibly symbolic and an emotional experience for me.  The whole race really just made me feel like, “I’m going to be okay.” I became teary on more than one occasion passing signs with photos of people the LLS had helped using the funds TNT raises. A survivor herself was near the finish line holding a sign that said “I’m here because of you!”

I am so happy I chose to do Team In Training and I recommend it to anyone who is looking for a way to train for an endurance events. TNT is designed to be accessible to people of all fitness levels. You can choose to walk, run, tri, hike or bike for a variety of distances.  If you are looking for a way to support TNT, I am very proud to announce that my friend from grad school, Becca, has chosen to join TNT and train in my honor for the Brewer’s Mini-Marathon in Milwaukee this September. You can follow her progress and learn more about her training at http://pages.teamintraining.org/wi/brewmara13/wendler.

In my next entry, I will update you on some of the others shenanigans I’ve been up to!

Advertisements