Frequently Asked Questions

One of the biggest blessings throughout my cancer journey was that we were located in the Austin, Texas area when my diagnosis happened. Austin is a notoriously high young adult population area and is also home to the LIVESTRONG Foundation and several other great oncology treatment, research  and advocacy organizations. I really found that I had a lot of age appropriate resources and information available to me, that many of my counterparts in other areas did not. Access to fertility preservation resources is probably one of the most important issues that differentiates the young adult cancer community from everyone else. For those that do not know, many types of chemotherapy and radiation treatment can negatively affect the body’s reproductive organs in both men and women. Ever since I announced that I was having twins, I received a lot of questions from people about how I got pregnant, how long it took me, whether my twins were fraternal, whether they were “natural,” whether twins run in the family, etc. While a lot of these questions come with the territory of having twins, because I am a cancer survivor and discussed my fertility journey publicly I think it attracts even more questions. Which is why I thought it was the time to revisit the topic of fertility and pregnancy from a cancer survivor’s perspective. I personally do not mind these questions (depending on the setting, use common sense people) because I made a choice to discuss these issues very publicly when I was going through cancer. I also know that people’s intentions are usually not malicious and I also want to make sure people who are going through infertility issues feel like they talk to me and ask me questions if they need to. However, I will preface this by saying most parents of multiples do not feel the same way, so I don’t encourage anyone to bring this up with others unless they have expressed a willingness to discuss it (and there are about 5 million blog posts out there about why you shouldn’t.)

I have discussed my fertility preservation experience quite a bit on my blog, and also spoke about it at a Leukemia & Lymphoma Society fertility forum a couple of years ago (see June 2012 and March 2013.) To recap, I underwent embryo preservation through invitro-fertilization prior to having chemo in June 2013. I also took lupron shots for the remainder of my chemotherapy and radiation treatment, which shut down my ovaries during that time period. Although originally designed for men undergoing treatment for prostate cancer, lupron use in women undergoing cancer treatments actually can help preserve ovarian function. I actually would like to segue here and just say one of the reasons I don’t get into the whole “which disease deserves the most research funding debate” is because of things like this. Many therapies designed for one purpose, can actually have unintended benefits for other purposes as well. The human body is extremely complex and amazing and I won’t pretend like I know better than someone else by saying what research we should and should not support.

Anyway, long story short, lupron worked for me. I was given the “green light” to start trying for a child six months after I ended radiation treatment. From what my oncologists told me, this was a pretty short time-frame and that one year is a more standard recommendation for people in remission from Hodgkin’s Lymphoma to wait before trying to conceive. I was very blessed my diagnosis was caught early, so I had much lower chemotherapy and radiation exposure than the average Hodgkin’s patient, which is why we were able to start trying sooner. However, many people are advised to wait much longer, or even forever, before trying to conceive. How treatment affects fertility is really very dependent on the diagnosis, the treatment received, the length of treatment or even just how that particular individual responds. Also, the damage done to the body during treatment can be so extreme that they physical cannot conceive and even if they are able to conceive, they are advised not to due to a variety of possible health concerns. And some of it is still a mystery, there’s just not a ton of research in this area yet.

I found out I was pregnant about six months after receiving the “green light,” which was just long enough for me to get extremely anxious and concerned. I think its common for survivors to feel like they are waiting for “the other shoe to drop” and I would think to myself that maybe this was it. I wouldn’t be able to get pregnant. The month I found out I was pregnant I went in for a check-up with my fertility specialist who insisted everything looked great. A few days later I found out I was pregnant. When I found out it was twins 10 weeks into my pregnancy, I was incredibly happy but also extremely shocked. As I mentioned in my blog previously, a psychic I went to at Voodoo Fest in 2006 predicted I would have twins and I would occasionally joke about having twins after that, particularly after we went through IVF, but I never genuinely believed it would happen for us. It truly was one of the happiest days of my life. However, I will say amid the joy, there was also a lot of anxiety. One of my first thoughts was “Oh my gosh, now I have two of them to worry about!” You don’t have to be a cancer survivor to know that there is a lot of fear that comes with being pregnant. With twins they pretty much tell you upfront you are at higher risk for almost every possible complication. As a cancer survivor, I was at higher risk for even more complications. Whether it is statistically true or not, I felt like my chances of something going wrong were  infinitely higher than average, and I was extremely scared that something would happen to one or both of my babies, that we would find out my body was unexpectedly damaged from chemo and  wouldn’t be able to handle the stress, and about a thousand other doomsday scenarios ran through my head.

I also felt like I didn’t deserve so many amazing blessings, especially in such a short time period. I really look back on those early months and realize there was a lot of survivor guilt at play. Why am I still alive and others aren’t? Why was I fortunate enough to have great health insurance when others are hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt with medical bills? Why was I blessed enough to pay for IVF AND get pregnant without assistance? How is it fair I got pregnant so soon when others can’t? Why am I so lucky to have TWO healthy babies when so many people can’t have one? How is it fair I am already out of treatment and PREGNANT when people who were diagnosed before me are still in the middle of their fight? Why is it fair that I have a job? And benefits? etc.  There was also anger AT THE GUILT. I just want unadulterated happiness DAMMIT, why do I have to have all of these OTHER FEELINGS swirling around. So many paradoxical emotions existed and its really just hard to explain to someone unless they have been there too. All I can say is I gave it to God, and I got through it. I accepted that this was my journey whether it was fair or not.

At the end of the day, it is the way it is. I had an amazing twin pregnancy. My kids were full-term, healthy, had no nicu-time and I am still healthy. I did not have a stroke, I did not have a heart attack, I did not have a blood clot or preeclampsia or any other thing I was convinced would happen. I was lucky. I was blessed. And I am extremely happy.

So to answer some of those FAQs:

Are they identical or fraternal?

Fraternal.

Are they boys or girls?

Boys.

Did we use fertility assistance?

Obviously this whole post is the answer, but the short answer is no. However, I would not be surprised if the fact that I had been on lupron did  cause me to hyperovulate (release more than one egg) when my ovaries came back online. According to my doctors, my past treatment should not have played into affect, but its one of those things that not a lot of research exists for. My body went through a LOT in a short period of time, and there’s no telling how those experiences may have affected my ovaries. I have run into a lot of people who have had twins without assistance after prior fertility treatments, so it does happen, but current research says there is not a cause and effect relationship.

Do twins run in the family?

For the record, identical twins (according to current research) just happen randomly and do not run in the family. Since I have fraternal twins and they are cause by hyperovulations which can be passed down through the mother’s side of the family, it is possible there is a family connection. At the time I got pregnant, I actually thought that twins did not run in my family. However, recently we found out there were quite a few twins on my great-grandmother’s side of the family and for whatever reason, two other cousins from that branch have also had fraternal twins recently, even though twins haven’t occurred for several generations prior to our’s. So it is possible they “run in the family,” and I would have hyperovulated even if I never had cancer.

What are you going to do with the embryos?

I don’t get this question often, but it is the hardest one to answer. It’s honestly not something I can discuss at this point because we just don’t know yet, and honestly I might never want to discuss it publicly. Will we want more kids, will we not? Will I be able to get pregnant again? All these things remain to be seen. However, for anyone else who is in a similar situation, there is a great blog post on Twiniversity.com that discusses what the typical options are for people who no longer want to use embryos from IVF.

Finally, do you wish you had never done IVF prior to treatment since you got pregnant without assistance?

This is another tough question. Would it be nice to have that money back? Of course, it was a life-changing amount of money. Would it have been better to avoid daily shots, hormone therapy, surgery, etc. Of course. But the answer is no. I do not regret having IVF. For whatever reason, these were the kids I was meant to have at this point in my life, and I probably wouldn’t have had these specific kids if I had not gone through cancer and if I had not done IVF. We had to make a lot of difficult choices in a short amount of time and we did the best we could. I will never regret those choices. I have two amazing kids because of those experiences and I wouldn’t trade them in for the world.

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