PT Scans and Mission Moments

It’s been awhile since I’ve written an entire blog post on my own and figured you were long overdue for an update. I actually wrote this post intermittently throughout the day yesterday. I got a large chunk of writing finished while waiting to have a PT scan done. I’ve actually been looking forward to having my PT scan. I like having the reassurance that everything is going well with my body. I didn’t get one after radiation, so I haven’t had one since the first week of September when they checked me out after my last chemo. Having a check-in will definitely make me feel better about everything.

Unfortunately, I forgot about everything that comes along with the PT scan. Beforehand, I have to get lab work done which means one needle stick. Once I get checked into radiology and they are ready for me, they insert an IV. Usually this only means one needle stick, but today it meant several. I offered the tech my left arm since the right had already been stuck once today, and I was trying to save it further trauma. The left didn’t work so well, so the right ended up getting doubly pricked despite my best efforts. They also let a nurse in training do my glucose check, so along with the sore arm I now also have a sore bird finger on the same hand as well. I also had to fast for four hours before my appointment. Once there, the whole process takes about 2-3 hours as well. Needless to say, I was a bit “hangry” by the end of my appointment, as my sister Sarah would say.

Also, some words of wisdom to anyone who might be having a PT scan. You are not allowed to wear anything medal when having a PT scan done. This includes underwire bras, ladies. No one reminded me of this fact before I went and instead of wearing my standard PT scan uniform of sweats with a baggie t-shirt/sports bra combo, I went in my work clothes that included a fairly tight shirt with my standard wired bra. It wasn’t until it was time for the PT scan that I realized my mistake. As luck would have it, my local hospital doesn’t have its own PT scan unit, so it uses a mobile unit that requires me to leave the comforts of the hospital before getting into what I affectionately call the “PT Mobile.” Again, not usually an issue. But once I changed out of my bra, I had to traverse the extremely chilly and breezy walkway between said PT mobile and the hospital building. I’m sure the PT scan techs got a nice visual of snap and crackle (How I Met Your Mother fans will catch my drift) in the process. At this point though, who at that hospital hasn’t seen my boobs? So I just kind of shrug off these awkward situations these days.

The local location of my healthcare system can only do PT scans on Wednesdays, which means they can’t schedule me for my follow-up with the oncologist to get my results until Monday, so I have the whole weekend to obsess over it. Its pretty nerve racking. While the chances of someone relapsing from stage 1 Hodgkin’s are extremely low, I personally have met people that it has happened to and — while thinking positive thoughts– I’m also trying not to be too blase about it just in case something turns up on the scan. I called my oncology nurse and she said that she could let me know on Friday if there was something to worry about or not, but that my doctor still wants to meet with me on Monday to discuss the results in detail. Hopefully I’ll get the all clear and can enjoy my weekend as much as possible. One of the reasons I keep myself so busy is because I don’t want to sink into obsessive/negative thoughts about whether or not my cancer will come back.

In addition to all the craziness I do on the reg (working full time, contract work, team-in-training, volunteering with the young adult social group, blogging, being married, etc.). I have a very active friend group with lots of major milestones coming up! In addition to a lot of wedding on the horizons, I’m going to two baby showers to go to this weekend! I am so incredibly excited it is ridiculous. I have the absolute cutest gifts too. I will  post some pictures of them after the baby showers because one of my teammates actually made them as part of her Team-In-Training fundraiser, and I absolutely have to give her a plug on here because she is amazing. She has helped me get all of my gift shopping done for the year basically, and it has saved me so much stress and time.

Speaking of which, Team In Training is going really well and has been an incredible blessing. One of my coaches this weekend was telling me how well I fit in and it felt like I’ve always been on the team, and I feel the exact same way. It’s like a family I never knew I had!

On Saturday, we had our mission practice where all the TNT groups in the city (triathlon, marathon and biking) get together and have one large practice. We started off practice with our scheduled mileage, which was 4 miles. The walkers did our’s in about an hour, which was pretty great time for me. After that, we all met back up and had a “mission moment” which was dedicated to Jay Taylor.

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We have a mission moment at every practice, but its usually pretty short and its basically consists of someone sharing a story that motivates them personally. Some talk about loved ones that they lost, and others about someone they know that is still going through it. This practice was dedicated to Jay because he is the honored hero for the whole team, and multiple people spoke about him. Jay became involved with TNT about 10 years ago after his mother passed away from cancer. I’m not exactly sure of the details, but I know that he served as both a participant and coach throughout the years. What was very obvious though, was that he made many close friends on the team.

One of the coaches sharing her story about Jay.

One of the coaches sharing her story about Jay.

About a year and a half ago, Jay was struggling to breathe while training for a triathlon he was doing through TNT. Soon he began having trouble breathing even when he was resting. They discovered that he had stage 4 lung cancer. Unfortunately, lung cancer is one of the less treatable forms of cancer and his was obviously very advanced by the time they caught it. He tried several experimental treatments, but unfortunately none of them are working and he recently flew home to Monroe, La. to enter into hospice care. His father is also battling cancer right now, so please keep their whole family in your prayers. I haven’t even met these folks, and I’m personally struggling with the injustice of it all. I can’t even comprehend what they are going through right now. However, his friends’ messages were that as helpless as cancer can make us feel, there are things we can do to fight and that’s what TNT is here for. It was really beautiful to see how many lives Jay affected in such a positive way, and I’m really sorry I haven’t had the chance to meet him.

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Teammates during Mission Moment

After the mission moment, we all did a silent mile — one of the most moving experiences of my life. Along the route there were several signs that served to educate the public and also to motivate the participants.

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As everyone finished the mile, they made two single file lines. As people finished they received high fives from all their teammates. I actually had no clue that they were going to do this. And since I had been taking photos of all the signs along the silent mile I had my hands very full and was grossly unprepared for the high five action I was received at the finish line. I was equally unprepared for the photo that they took of me.

Laura mission mile

I mean, really?

Rene looked awesome though.

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My husband is much more photogenic than I am.

But in all seriousness, as I was going through my sea of teammates, I was close to tears several times. It was such an incredibly moving experience. As I went by, many of the people who knew my story gave my hand an extra squeeze and patted me on the back. It was really amazing. I seriously recommend TNT to anyone trying to do endurance sports, whether they have a personal connection to the cause or not. The atmosphere is incredibly magical and positive.

After the last person came in, we all got into our standard huddle that we do at the beginning and end of most practices and yelled “Go Team!” It was the loudest “Go Team!” I’ve heard yet.

It became more of a party atmosphere after that, and we went to the tents they had set up and had breakfast tacos, bagels and all sorts of goodies. One of the coaches also had made us our own special ribbons with the names of our honored heroes/angels on them. See if you can spot which one is mine.

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Hint: It’s the LSU-esque one in the middle.

Someone also made a poster with photos of all the honored heroes.

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Three of my honored heroes and angels were pictured as well. In the shot below, you can see both Grant Hebert (who you may have read about in the entry Mary and Grant) and Jeannie Wannage, my friend’s mom who passed away a few years ago.

Grant and Jeannie

Also pictured was my sister’s friend and coworker, Brent Mesquit, who is currently fighting Multiple Myleoma.

Brent Mesquit

TNT also had invited a representative from Be the Match there to register folks for the bone marrow registry.

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As y’all know, this is one of the causes I’m most passionate about and it was beautiful to see a huge long line forming of these amazing TNT volunteers. The line would probably be longer, but many of the people there were already registered or (like me) are not allowed to due to our medical history. Others, like my husband (who was born in Germany), have spent too many years in certain countries and are not allowed to donate.  My point is that many people who would be otherwise willing and motivated to do so, are not allowed to donate blood or join the bone marrow registry for various reasons. If you qualify, please please consider becoming a blood bone marrow donor. To find out if you qualify and to learn more about the bone marrow registry, visit www.marrow.org. My friend, Amber, recently donated bone marrow and wrote a guest blog post, Be the Match, awhile back which you can read here. I know several other people that have registered since my illness, and I’m very excited to find out if they ever get matched with someone in need.

We ended the Mission Practice with our first ever team photo. I am so incredibly proud to be part of team-in-training.

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One thought on “PT Scans and Mission Moments

  1. Pingback: Remembering Jay Taylor | the lymphoma letters

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